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Mr Soul



Joined: 21 May 2006
Posts: 741

PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2006 2:13 pm    Post subject: What do you think ? Reply with quote

I've grown up with dogs and while I realize that they can be messy, I don't know which way to go. I'm actually considering other species. Any suggestions ?
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Matt



Joined: 21 May 2006
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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2006 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Animals are difficult. That's why I'm an orchid grower. But, if I got an animal, I think it would be a parrot. Aren't they pretty easy?
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lady_express_44



Joined: 22 May 2006
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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2006 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think most animals are quite messy, except cats.

My daughter got these cute little turtles for her birthday one year . . . but then they grew up. Even they were a messy (and stinky).

I'd stick with a dog myself.

Cherie
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agate
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Joined: 17 May 2006
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Location: Oregon

PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2006 10:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like dogs well enough but have had only cats in my adult life. The other day I was at the vet's with my cat, and we had a long wait in the small waiting area. Large dog after large dog seemed to be coming and going there, and sometimes there were two or three big dogs in the room at once.

I was very aware of the distinctly doggy odor all around. And they kept hanging their tongues out and panting all the time.

It's the human's job to keep the dog clean, I guess. Cats keep themselves clean unless they're very ill.

I've never known any parrots personally but have known some parakeets. A parrot, since it's much larger than a parakeet, would probably require quite a bit of cleanup if you don't mind cleaning a birdcage.

A neighbor of mine had 5 cockatiels at one time in a small apartment. They kept flying around the place, and they had to do that because they couldn't be caged all the time. Parrots might have some quirk like that. I think I'd read up on parrots before I got one.
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Anonymous
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PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 11:53 am    Post subject: Re: What do you think ? Reply with quote

Well, what about a horse or a pony? You only need a big shovel and little linseed oil.

Joking.. though horses do make wonderful pets.

Don't get a goat though. Mean.

It's been my experience that fish and most birds aren't very interactive. The larger parrots are like family members but you really have to work with them and they can be destructive.

I love cats and dogs and I have two dogs now.

I don't have any stinky problems (!) with them but I bathe them regularly. I groom them myself (meaning clipping them) - it helps form a bond between master and dog. Some breeds don't shed and only a few breeds excessively slobber. My dogs don't shed or pant unless they are outside and hot. Panting is how they sweat and cool off.

If you're a dog person, I'd say stick with dogs. It's a personality thing, you know. Mine are great company.

Agate, my 20 year old cat died a few years ago and I've never been able to adopt another one. I'm not sure why but probably because he was so special to me.

Joy
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Snoopy



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 195

PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dave,

Have you thought about a hamster. Their life span isn't very long 2 or 3 years.

Hamsters can be quite entertaining and if your smokin' while playing with one it just may keep you entertained for hours :tongue:
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PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Snoopy wrote:
Dave,

Have you thought about a hamster. Their life span isn't very long 2 or 3 years.

Hamsters can be quite entertaining and if your smokin' while playing with one it just may keep you entertained for hours :tongue:


My niece raises all kinds of these little furry beggers. She'd probably send you one for free, once you sign a release that you'll treat it like your first born and leave all your worldly possessions to it should you meet an unfortunate demise.

In other words, she is picky. She says rats make wonderful pets but I can't attest to that.
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Mr Soul



Joined: 21 May 2006
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PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks guys, but I'm leaning towards a dog. My kids had hamsters growing up and while they are pretty maintenance free, as long as you feed 'em and clean their cage once in awhile, 3 years is a very optimistic life span for them.
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agate
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PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can't sell you on hamsters?

http://www.hampsterdance.com/classorig.html
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Snoopy



Joined: 23 May 2006
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PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="squishybrain
My niece raises all kinds of these little furry beggers. She'd probably send you one for free, once you sign a release that you'll treat it like your first born and leave all your worldly possessions to it should you meet an unfortunate demise.

In other words, she is picky. She says rats make wonderful pets but I can't attest to that.[/quote]

Your niece sounds like a friend of mine who raises mini Hamsters....a little over the top.

I can't stand rats or mice, I think it's the tail but they seriously make me feel sick. Hamsters on the other hand I don't have a problem with.
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Snoopy



Joined: 23 May 2006
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PostPosted: Sat May 27, 2006 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mr Soul wrote:
Thanks guys, but I'm leaning towards a dog. My kids had hamsters growing up and while they are pretty maintenance free, as long as you feed 'em and clean their cage once in awhile, 3 years is a very optimistic life span for them.


Have you considered a cat their much less work than a dog but if your not a cat person that obviously won't work.

I have had dogs non-stop for 25 years but when our current dog dies I don't want anymore - animals are really hard on carpet and I would like to put in new but not while our dog is alive.

The carpet took a real beating from our other dog who we had to put down a couple of years ago.
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PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2006 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Snoopy wrote:
Mr Soul wrote:
Thanks guys, but I'm leaning towards a dog. My kids had hamsters growing up and while they are pretty maintenance free, as long as you feed 'em and clean their cage once in awhile, 3 years is a very optimistic life span for them.


Have you considered a cat their much less work than a dog but if your not a cat person that obviously won't work.

I have had dogs non-stop for 25 years but when our current dog dies I don't want anymore - animals are really hard on carpet and I would like to put in new but not while our dog is alive.

The carpet took a real beating from our other dog who we had to put down a couple of years ago.



Snoopy got me thinking...

Mr. Soul,

Have you a breed in mind?

I was thinking this morning about pets for you. Nice I'm so concerned, huh. :)

Dogs are great, love em, but they require a lot of attention in addition to grooming.

I'm home all day with mine so I'm here to let them outside. Train them. Spend time with them. No separation anxiety in the equation here. No damage either (except for one corner of a piece of furniture chewed). No biggie because I expect these things to happen. The companionship more than pays for any mishaps.

They are pack animals and you will officially become the pack. Not that you can't have a dog and work outside the home but it makes it more difficult and considerably more stressful to own a dog if you spend hours away from home every day.

You probably know all this, just a reminded while you're thinking about a dog. Dogs, depending on the breed, live 8-20 years. It takes a lot of commitment.

Most dogs also need a job or they get extremely bored and boredom leads to catastrophes. For instance, my older dog's job (11 years-old) is catching a Frisbee. He is an excellent Frisbee dog. You can't say the "F" word around my house without having a bouncing mutt in your face. My younger dog (14 months old) watches the street for me. She is a protector. She's still not mature enough to know what her chosen career is though. :)

Puppies are a total PITA. They chew on the possessions of those they love most (which is a strange way of expressing love). They want to play all the time. They have accidents on the carpet. It takes time to train them and teach them the rules of your household.

You might consider a pup a little older, six months are so. That's still young enough to mold and old enough to bypass some of the irritations.

One more thought : Siamese cats are very dog-like in their behavior. Very vocal as well but so are my dogs (which have a large vocabulary of grunts and various noices). I've owned a Siamese before and they are like no other cat.

Cats are great too.

Best of luck to you with this decision,
Joy (squishybrain)
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agate
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PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2006 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Joy, I'd say you really know your dogs! I think you've made some really good points.

Not knowing much about dogs myself, I was surprised to hear about doggy daycare for dogs. When I wondered why anyone would go to the bother and expense of putting a pet dog into a doggy daycare program, I soon found out that dogs just don't do well when left home alone for long stretches of time each day. Now I understand.

The one dog I had lived in a household where there was always someone home, and so I never saw the problems that could develop.

I don't mean to badmouth dogs here (my previous post may seem a bit negative). I actually like dogs a lot!
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lady_express_44



Joined: 22 May 2006
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Location: Vancouver, Canada

PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2006 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've always had a dog in my life, and will normally raise them from puppies. They are just like kids, and need consistency and attention for the first year or two.

I used to always have German Shepards, because they are so smart and great protectors. Unfortunately, they often get genetic problems like hip displacement, etc., so they don't tend to live as long as other dogs.

I ventured out with the last dog, and got a Jack Russel that was already 18 months old. I had two small kids, with tons of energy, so I thought this would be ok. He has turned out to be the smartest and best dog I've ever had. He is 7 now, but he can still learn new tricks within no time. I like how small he is too.

They need exercise, and the more the better, but they adapt to whatever routine you get them into. My dog normally needs at least 15 minutes of chasing the ball, twice a day, in the spring / summer / fall . . . But he recognizes winter as the "lazy" season and is happy with 10 minutes of petting during that season.

If I ever get another dog, it will be another Jack Russel. They are amazing companions!

Cherie
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Mr Soul



Joined: 21 May 2006
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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 9:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm kinda leaning towards a Doberman Pinscher. They are short-haired, which I like cuz they ain't gonna be shedding around here. I know they used to be considered hostile, but I've since "met" some really well-tempered dobes.
Any thoughts ?
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lady_express_44



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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had one, and it was a mental-case. They are very loyal to their masters, but can be a real danger to anyone else.

I'm a dog-person, so you'd think we'd get along well . . . but not so. She was my (ex) hubby's (even though we got her him as a couple, when she was just a pup). She pinned me on a couple of occasions; at the kitchen table, and upstairs. I couldn't go anywhere until my hubby came home.

We had to get rid of her. I don't trust them.

Cherie
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Snoopy



Joined: 23 May 2006
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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yikes! The one Doberman I had been around was psycho. I could pet him one minute and the next he would try to bite me.

As I said the dog was psycho but then again so was the owner.
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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

agate wrote:
Joy, I'd say you really know your dogs! I think you've made some really good points.

Not knowing much about dogs myself, I was surprised to hear about doggy daycare for dogs. When I wondered why anyone would go to the bother and expense of putting a pet dog into a doggy daycare program, I soon found out that dogs just don't do well when left home alone for long stretches of time each day. Now I understand.

The one dog I had lived in a household where there was always someone home, and so I never saw the problems that could develop.

I don't mean to badmouth dogs here (my previous post may seem a bit negative). I actually like dogs a lot!


agate,

You weren't badmouthing dogs! Not in my opinion.

I do know dogs. I trust them more than I do most people.

Dave,

I've never owned a Dobie myself but aside from the occasional genetic problem, it's been my experience that there are no bad dogs, just bad owners. My son owns two American Bit Bulls and they are incredibly sweet, loving animals. My sister owned a Rottie that was a sweatheart too.

Dobies are the dog-of-the-month in Dog Fancy for July 2006. Let me see what they have to say.

What a gorgeous animal!

Quoted from the magazine:

Quote:
Dobermans are large dogs with great intelligence and a high prey drive, which can make them a formidable breed for a first-time dog owner. They are, bar none, the most wonderful, responsive, intuitive, intellgient, workable breed out there, but they take a lot of work




Quote:
Country of origin: Germany
Original use - protection
Group - working dog
Grooming- brush or wipe down with a damp towel weekly
Height/weight- Males, 26 to 28 inches; females, 24 to 26 inches; 65 to 90 pounds, with males heavier than feamles.
Trainability - High
Actiivty level - high
Known health problems ; Cardiomyopathy, hip dysplasia, hypothyroidism, progressive retinal atrophy, cervical vertebral instability, also called wobbler syndrome (an orthopedic disease causing loss of balance), von Willebrand's disease (a bleeding disorder).
Good with children?- Well-socialized females are best with older children
Good with other pets?- Sometimes; avoiding pairing same-sex large dogs, especially males. Dobermans sometimes submit to smaller dogs.

Would you like to know more? There is an article here about them. They are considered to be sharp and loyal companions but you'd want to
study how to train your puppy to avoid undesirable behavior. Same as with any dog really.

This is a hands-on dog.

Quote:
"Walk a Doberman Pinscher down the street, and people won't see that goofy cuddly lap dog you know at home," cautions Faye Strauss of Ken, Wash., a breeder, AKC judkge, and author of The New Owner's Guide to Doberman Pinschers "The most common misconception is that Dobermans are mean or vicious. This is not true. They are naturally protective of their property and will bark at intruders, but once you accept a visitor, they are friendly and trustworthy.

But don't expect your neighbors to believe that. "You have to be ready for breed prejudice," Doniere warns. "They have a bad reputation and their look, which I find beautiful, can scare people. Insurance companies may refuse homeowners insurance to Doberman owners, and some cities have banned Dobermans. "We keep trying to educate people, but we also don't want to downplay a breed with the potential to do great harm in the wrong hands," Mullen says.


I totally agree with this. For instance, my DIL does not walk their American Pit Bull because she cannot control him IF something were to happen. My son is the only one strong enough plus the dogs were trained by him.

I believe it's wise to never underestimate your animal. Even a small one. I don't allow people (at Petsmart for instance) to reach out and touch one of my dogs. You never know when a dog might become scared or protective.

I also thought you might want to check your area for banning. Sometimes the ban means that you can own the breed but you must spay or neuter.

Consider the gender too. AND really really consider where you get the dog. A breeder who shows dogs generally cares very much about keeping the breed healthy and pure.

I'm such a chatty Kathy when it comes to dogs.
Sorry.
Joy
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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 11:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

lady_express_44 wrote:
I had one, and it was a mental-case. They are very loyal to their masters, but can be a real danger to anyone else.

I'm a dog-person, so you'd think we'd get along well . . . but not so. She was my (ex) hubby's (even though we got her him as a couple, when she was just a pup). She pinned me on a couple of occasions; at the kitchen table, and upstairs. I couldn't go anywhere until my hubby came home.

We had to get rid of her. I don't trust them.

Cherie


Gosh, Cherie, this is terrible. They are certainly big enough and athletic enough to pin anyone down!

I've met Dobies who were friendly and sweet. Breeding and training is important for any dog, especially those bred for protection (such as the Dobies).

Just curious, what did you do with her?

Joy
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Mr Soul



Joined: 21 May 2006
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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow. Interesting comments. I had a sheepdog once (talk about high maintenance! ...but I sure think they look cool) and an Irish Setter, which were both good dogs, but now that I'm on my own, I can't deal with all that maintenance so I'm looking for a short-hair.
My son really likes boxers (and their hair is short enough but I don't think I can tolerate all that drooling (and they are pretty damn ugly dontknow .
One thing I'm pretty adament about is, I wanna "rescue" one, from one of these shelters. I don't wanna buy a pure-bred. It's not so much the money part of the issue, it's my compassion for all those "homeless" dogs that'll end up getting put to sleep if they don't get adopted (spoken like a true bleeding-heart liberal).
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lady_express_44



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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We raised Shepards, before and after the Dobie, and never had a problem. Our shepards wandered the streets and were friends with all the neighborhood kids. In fact, the kids used to come and "call on her" to play. sunny

Protective dogs DO NOT need to be taught to protect; it is instinct. What they need more then anything is a TON of love, attention and affection, right from the time they are small puppies. Our Dobie was given that, just like all of our other dogs, but I think she had brain damage or something. It may have just been a fluke experience, but I wouldn't trust them again. Same with Rotties.

We gave her up to the pound, Joy. She was a beautiful dog, but I doubt she lasted anywhere very long.

We got our Jack Russel from the pound too. The vet said he reckons he's a purebred, but I think he's a cross between a JR Terrier and a Fox Terrier. He's short-haired, but still sheds a lot.

Cherie
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Mr Soul



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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, what you're saying, lady, is that I may be able to get a dobe at the pound ? Although I would question it's "friendliness" especially if it was bred as some sort of an attack dog in the inner city (MOST of 'em). Is that a viable concern ?
Your comments about their loyalty and intelligence really appeal to me.
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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mr. Soul, I'm a bleeding heart liberal too. I even hug trees. Literally.

My two dogs are schnauzers. The male is a black and white (not salt and pepper, which have a wiry undercoat) and the little female is shiny black. I wasn't looking for another dog when Trinny found me. My vet tech called me and asked please would I take her and when I met her it was love at first sight. Schnauzers are robust little dogs. Nothing frufru about them. Loyal. Protective. Energetic. Intelligent. They often get a bad rap too from people who say they bark and bite. It's all about training and trust.

I'd post a picture of my dogs but I can't figure out how to do it.

I still don't believe Dobies are undesirable dogs. I know Rotties aren't. The reason I don't personally want one is because of their size.

If you're getting a dog from the pound s/he will most likely find you with soulful eyes staring at you from behind bars. She'll know you rescued her. I believe dogs recognize and appreciate things like that.

I'm really happy for you that you're going to get a dog. Let us know how it goes.
Good luck,
Joy
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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mr. Soul,

I think getting a Dobie means you never have to go the bathroom alone again. HAHA!

Make sure that the pound or wherever you adopt a dog does a behaviorial assessment. They should know if a dog is suitable and if there are any special need concerns.

People give up dogs to the pound for all sorts of reasons. Mostly because they only think they want a dog. Puppies are cute but then responsibility sets in.

Our local animal shelter has a zero kill rate. No animal is euthanized but they also don't take every animal. They're not in the business of euthanizing animals, they're in the business of finding homes. If a dog, for instance, is a menace to soceity it's the owner's job to take it to the vet and have it put down.

Soul, we have Katrina dogs in our local shelter. My vet took the overflow. There are ALL kinds of dogs up for adoption. Look on the internet for legit rescue operations for Dobies. I bet they're out there. I wish I knew of a good Dobie up for adoption for you.

Joy
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lady_express_44



Joined: 22 May 2006
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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You should be able to find a nice Dobie at the pound, Dave. I'd just go for the youngest pup you can get because most of them can be trained if you get them early enough.

Just be sure not to do ANYTHING that would train him/her to be a protector!!!! (Can't emphasize that fact enough), i.e. don't alert him to someone coming on the property, and socialize him as much as possible with people and other dogs, etc. As Joy said, most of this breed would be ok if they are raised properly, as Joy said.

Cherie
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Mr Soul



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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 8:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Joy"Dogs, depending on the breed, live 8-20 years. It takes a lot of commitment.(squishybrain)[/quote]
Well, I hear ya Joy, and I guess that's why I've been dragging my feet on this. I just wanna be sure, y'know ? This is a major decision in my life these days.
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lady_express_44



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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 7:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If the dog is socialized, then it will adapt to a new home, should that become necessary.

It sounds like you will provide the dog with a loving home, for as long as it lasts, so I wouldn't let that be a deciding factor for you. That goes for ANY kind of relationship - with people or animals!

You only go around once, at least that you can remember with any clarity!

Cherie
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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 7:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mr Soul wrote:
[quote="Joy"Dogs, depending on the breed, live 8-20 years. It takes a lot of commitment.(squishybrain)

Quote:
Well, I hear ya Joy, and I guess that's why I've been dragging my feet on this. I just wanna be sure, y'know ? This is a major decision in my life these days


Soul, I like your avatars. This is....is.... how I feel some days, stretched thin in my skin.

I don't know what you mean by "these days" but if you'd like to talk it through, I'm (we're) here.

I waffled on my decision to take my young dog. I can appreciate your struggle as I probably experienced a similar struggle myself (but I won't make any assumptions here). Are you concerned about your MS?

Joy
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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 1:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Soul, I made you a video of my furry baby girl. You can see why it was love at first sight.


I had to delete my previous post because I had a day at the zoo video posted there and it had my full name on it. Otherwise, I would love to share it. I'll fix it and do that.

Joy

I removed the above link - those who wanted to see it, did


Last edited by Anonymous on Fri Jun 02, 2006 9:37 am; edited 1 time in total
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Matt



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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 2:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh that is a great photo show! Trinny is really adorable!
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one&only



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PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 2:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Matt wrote:
Animals are difficult. That's why I'm an orchid grower. But, if I got an animal, I think it would be a parrot. Aren't they pretty easy?


Matt, parrots aren't easy, they are very demanding of attention. They are like having a small child around the house.

They are truly special, they are so intelligent, and can know what humor is.

I have a Quaker parrot, quite a vocal fellow.

I also have 3 cats, that would be my suggestion for a new pet. I couldn't live without one, or two, or three.
O&O
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ewizabeth



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PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mr. Soul,

Maybe you could consider an iguana. They are pretty maintenance free and quiet. You only need to clean the cage and take them out on a leash once in awhile. Also, they like a warm bath and a nap on your tummy. Our youngest son had one named Ziggy for years. He was a character.

We have had all sorts of pets through the years. Now, we have one elderly cat, Sweet Pea.
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agate
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

An iguana on the tummy would be quite a drastic change after a warm hairy cat, but then I'm not the one looking for a pet. On hot days an iguana might have a nice cooling effect.

My son had a chameleon and a newt at different times. And then there was the toad. I'm sorry that an iguana wasn't among the pets. I didn't even know they could be pets. Thanks for enlightening me!
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ewizabeth



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 9:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agate,

One night I went into his room, and he was sound asleep with Ziggy sleeping on his chest. I had to pick Ziggy up (!) and sit him in his cage for the night. He hung there, sound asleep as I put him to bed.

Ziggy was about five feet long, head to tip of tail, and that tail was like a bullwhip, and he wasn't afraid to use it! pale

We had many kinds of pets while the boys were growing up, I could go on and on...

I like cats the best though. Sweet Pea is considered geriatric, and might not be around much longer. She has dementia, kidney problems, and arthritis in her hips, the poor thing. I give her special food and medicine to keep her comfortable. She spends a lot of time on DH's lap and sleeps the rest of the time.

Kathy
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